PALEO & WHOLE30 ROAST BEEF SPICE RUB

PALEO & WHOLE30 ROAST BEEF SPICE RUB
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PALEO & WHOLE30 ROAST BEEF SPICE RUB

PALEO & WHOLE30 ROAST BEEF SPICE RUB

Part of my cooking routine is to prepare PALEO & WHOLE30 dishes that I can blog about and also meet my husband’s culinary desires and needs.  The protein I cook is often eaten in different ways.  For example, this roast will be enjoyed for dinner and over the next day, Shawn will have roast beef sandwiches to take to work for his lunch.

 

The roast can be boring after a while.  This spice rub will literally spice up the flavour and meal you are making.

 

Prime rib and tenderloin are tasty and popular cuts when the protein is the primary focal point of the meal.  Hunt for organic and grass-fed options if possible.

 

RECIPE NUTRITIONAL VALUE

I have pernicious anemia and so require sufficient doses of vitamin B-12 through food, vitamins, and shots. Once in a while, I crave beef.  The fact is beef contains high-quality protein and nutrients like Creatine and Carnosine, which are important for our muscles and brain.

 

We have a hefty beef farming industry in our community in Ontario, Canada. We also have very cold winters.  Around the world, there is much controversy over this term called ‘grass-fed.’  In our community cows are generally fed grass in the summer and finished on corn before processing.  However, we also have a few organic farms.  A local organic beef farmer feeds his cattle summer grass and in winter the cattle consume hay and legumes.  The legumes are grown in the field with the grass and so are mixed when the hay is harvested and wrapped. (Finishing is a term used to describe the time that the cattle are fattened before processing).  

 

I learned that cattle finished on corn and/or grain and given hormones can have a daily weight gain of up to three pounds.  Finishing on corn gives the beef more fat marbling. Cattle finished on hay and legumes are generally smaller animals that gain about one pound in weight per day.

 

As a food writer aiming to please my guests when entertaining, I’ve always advocated for cattle finished on corn because this method provides the beef with more marbling, and therefore fatter, and therefore more flavor.  And my adage has always been, “Where there’s no fat, there’s no flavor.” 

I love marbling! 

 

But since living a Paleo & Whole30 lifestyle, I’ve embraced and implemented grass-fed beef into our diet.  My naturopathic doc, who also happens to be a medical doc, Dr. Mordy Levy (Toronto, Canada) advocates the consumption of organic, grass-fed beef on occasion and in moderation.  Every country has its own ideas and regulations about cattle feeding.  I was told by this organic farmer that in Canada we have no organization advocating for organic, grass-fed cattle.

 

In the United States, cattle grazed on grass for the first six months to a year of their lives, but then are finished at a feedlot.  The cattle spend anywhere from 60 to 200 days at the feedlot where they are fed a concentrated combination of corn, soy, grains, supplements, as well as hormones and antibiotics.   Those in this industry may refer to this as a ‘balanced ration for optimum weight.’ 

 

During the 200 days at a feedlot, the cattle gain as much as 400 pounds.  If a cow can gain three pounds of fat per day and you multiply this by 200 days, it’s easy to understand how this much weight can be acquired over 200 days.  Once the cattle are fattened to their ‘finished weight’ they are transported to the slaughterhouse.

 

According to the American Grassfed Beef Association, “an animal’s nutrient profile can significantly change at that time. During those months of grain finishing, levels of important nutrients like CLA and Omega-3 fatty acids decrease dramatically in the animal’s tissues.”

 

This is an important point when you are considering beef in your diet.  The more I can provide my husband and me with natural forms of Omega 3’s, the better the health of our bodies and brains. 

 

I personally believe that the way cows are treated and fed has an effect on the nutritional value of beef.  Many scientists agree.  (By the same token many cattle farmers and scientists disagree.)  Everyone is entitled to their opinion.

 

As it was explained to me, cows naturally eat grass.  This affects their digestive track, PH levels, and the fatty acid composition of the meat.   

 

According to an article by Dr. Rekha Mankad, M.D. on the Mayo Clinic website, “grass-fed beef may have some heart-health benefits that other types of beef don’t have.”  Dr. Mankad goes on to say that grass-fed beef may have less total fat, more Omega-3 fatty acids, more conjugated linoleic acid (a type of fat that is believed to reduce heart disease and cancer risks), and more antioxidant vitamins, such as vitamin E and others.

 

There are three main types of saturated fat found in red meat. They are stearic acid, palmitic acid, and mystristic acid. Grass-fed beef is believed to be consistently higher in proportions of stearic acid, which does not raise blood cholesterol levels.

 

If at all possible, buy beef directly from the farmer where you can witness first-hand how the animals live and are treated.

 

RECIPE TASTE PROFILE:

The predominant taste sensations of this rub are salty and spicy.  These qualities will nicely offset sweet potato or butternut squash.

 

DIRTY-BIRDY WINE PARTNER (FOR THOSE MAINTAINING A PALEO OR WHOLE30 LIFESTYLE)

With the predominant taste sensations of this rub being salty and a smidge of heat from the chili peppers, choose a white wine with loads of acidity and a hint of sweetness.  The wine’s acidity will nicely offset the saltiness and some sweetness to offset the spiciness.  An off-dry Riesling or Gewurztraminer would work nicely with the spice rub and also complement sweet potato or butternut squash.

 

If going for a red, choose one that is fruity and smooth with soft tannin and astringency.  The reason is that the hint of spiciness from the chili flakes will counteract the tannin and astringency, making the red’s lovely bitterness taste almost rancid and offensive.  Go for a soft, fruity California Merlot.

 

RECIPE:

PALEO & WHOLE30 INGREDIENTS FOR ROAST BEEF SPICE RUB
Place all ingredients in a clean bowl.

PALEO & WHOLE30 ROAST BEEF SPICE RUB
Mix all spice rub ingredients together.

PALEO & WHOLE30 SPICE RUB ON ROAST BEEF
Add olive oil to spices. Mix well. Coat top of your beef cut.

PALEO & WHOLE30 SPICE RUB FOR ROAST BEEF
Add vegetables of choice to the roasting pan. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for anywhere from 35 to 50 minutes to the desired doneness. Let roast rest for about 10 to 15 minutes. Slice and serve. Medium rare (35 to 45 minutes); Medium (45 to 50 minutes); Well done (50 to 60 minutes).

 

 

  • Author: FRESHDOH
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 50
  • Total Time: 55
  • Yield: 2.5 lb roast 1x
  • Category: PALEO & WHOLE30
  • Method: ROASTING
  • Cuisine: DINNER
  • Diet: Gluten Free
Scale

Ingredients

1 (2.5 lb) organic, grass-fed sirloin beef roast (if possible)
2 tsp salt
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp cracked black pepper
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp oregano
1/3 tsp chili flakes
2 tbsp olive oil

Instructions

Preheat oven to 325 F.  Place all spice ingredients in a glass bowl.  Mix well.  Add olive oil to make a paste.  Add vegetables of choice to the roasting pan. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for anywhere from 35 to 50 minutes to the desired doneness.  Let roast rest for about 10 to 15 minutes.  Slice and serve.  Medium rare (35 to 45 minutes); Medium (45 to 50 minutes); Well done (50 to 60 minutes).

 

Notes

The recipe baking temperature and time is an estimate.  Follow your own oven’s temperature and cooking time. It takes a gas oven 10-15 minutes to reach the desired temperature. Electric ovens can take 10 minutes longer than that.  The age of your oven will also determine the temperature, time for roasting or baking, and where you want to place your dish in the oven.  The bottom of your oven may be hotter than the top, depending on its condition.  This also includes where to set your dish under the broiler.  So use your own best judgment based on the type, condition, and age of your oven.  Prep times will also vary depending on how slow or quickly you like to work.

 

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