Tag: grain free diet

PALEO & WHOLE30 BUDDHA TURKEY BURGERS

PALEO & WHOLE30 BUDDHA TURKEY BURGERS

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PALEO & WHOLE30 BUDDHA TURKEY BURGERS

PALEO & WHOLE30 BUDDHA TURKEY BURGERS

I am a fan of all types of cuisine, including Chinese, Japanese, and Thai.  Many of these cultural recipes include soy sauce.   Soy sauce is an ingredient that is not PALEO & WHOLE30 compliant.

Those living low sodium and/or gluten-free lifestyle or taking part in a Paleo or Whole30 diet, usually refrain from using soy sauce.  Soy sauce typically contains wheat (grain) and is super high in sodium.

We are addicted to soy sauce as it is high in the 5th taste sensation called umami.  Umami is the Japanese word for “yummy.”  Umami is what we refer to as roundness and depth of flavour. This 5th taste sensation is not a combination of any of the other taste sensations of sweet, sour, bitter, salty.  That is often a misconception.  Umami is a sensation all its own, providing us with that comfort food feeling.  It gives us that feeling of satisfaction after eating spaghetti, Chinese food (with soy sauce), ripe tomatoes, cooked potatoes, and aged cheeses like Parmesan.  Umami hits the back of our palate, leaving us with a craving for more.  Remember years ago Chinese food always contained MSG?  That’s the acronym for Monosodium Glutamate.  MSG is a flavour enhancer.  The “Monosodium” contains the sodium salt of glutamate acid.  The Glutamate (a naturally occurring amino acid found in many foods) is the umami, that savoury experience!  When found naturally, the umami is simplistic.  If the food is slow-cooked in some form or aged the umami becomes synergistic and many times more flavourful.  MSG has for a long time been linked to headaches and other side effects.  Now take-out Chinese food is made without MSG.

In North America, we are addicted to Ketchup.  Ketchup is slow-roasted tomatoes high in synergistic umami.  That’s one of the many reasons we love ketchup so much.  It is our “go-to” condiment loaded in synergistic umami. 

Asian cuisine also includes an umami-rich condiment called soy sauce.  Soy sauce contains large amounts of free glutamic acid, which is the source of that umami taste. 

If we are committed to eating in a healthy way, it’s important to watch our sodium intake.  Consuming soy sauce freely can blow this commitment you have to a low-sodium diet right out of the bottle!

As I’ve written about in the past, consuming too much sodium can possibly lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and cause calcium loss. We should consume no more than 700 milligrams or less per meal.  If we eat three meals per day, that’s 2100 grams of sodium consumed in moderation. 

When enjoying dishes and foods containing soy sauce, our sodium intake can dramatically increase if we are not diligent about keeping it low.  Did you know that one tablespoon of light soy sauce used in Cantonese cuisine contains 1190 milligrams of sodium?  That’s almost half of the recommended daily requirement in one tablespoon!  Dark soy sauce used in Chinese and Taiwanese dishes is also high in sodium, over 900 milligrams per tablespoon.  Japanese Kikkoman soy sauce contains 920 milligrams of sodium per tablespoon.  Kikkoman’s low sodium soy sauce contains 580 milligrams per tablespoon.  This means that consuming just two tablespoons of this condiment almost uses up your daily recommended requirement.

When do we ever stick to just one tablespoon of soy sauce when splashing this condiment on Chinese fried rice?  Do you keep track of how many tablespoons of soy sauce you actually consume with your sushi? 

I discovered a fabulous soy sauce substitute called Coconut Aminos or Coconut Sauce.  Coconut Aminos is a salty, savory seasoning sauce made from the fermented sap of coconut palm and sea salt.  It is soy-free, wheat-free, and gluten-free, lower in sodium, and loaded with umami.  One tablespoon of coconut Aminos is 360 milligrams of sodium. 

Coconut Aminos is lighter in colour than Kikkoman soy sauce with a slightly sweeter tone and far less saltiness.  I actually prefer this condiment to my once favourite Kikkoman brand. 

Use coconut amino is all the same ways you would normally use soy sauce and at the same 1 to 1 ratio.  It can be found in bulk food stores, health food stores, and now in many supermarkets. 

NUTRITIONAL VALUE

Ground turkey is an excellent source of niacin and selenium and a decent source of vitamin B6, phosphorus, and zinc.  Ground breast meat is 150 calories, 1.5 grams of fat, and 0 grams of saturated fat.  It is also a good source of protein, 100 grams of meat offering 27 grams of protein.

RECIPE TASTE SENSATIONS

The predominant taste sensation of the sauce and slow is saltiness, due to the Coconut Aminos.  

DIRTY-BIRDY WINE PARTNER (FOR THOSE MAINTAINING PALEO & WHOLE30 LIFESTYLE)

Ground turkey is white meat, calling for white wine.  The predominant taste sensation of the burger sauce and the salad is saltiness due to the Coconut Aminos.  So choose a white wine with a zinging backbone of acidity.  The acidity will offset the saltiness bringing harmony to your palate.  Good examples are Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, Pinot Gris, Vinho Verde, dry Riesling.

  • Author: FRESHDOH
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 35
  • Yield: 4 1x
  • Category: PALEO & WHOLE30
  • Method: SAUTING
  • Cuisine: DINNER
  • Diet: Gluten Free
Scale

Ingredients

1 pound ground turkey

½ cup matchstick carrots, finely chopped

1 tablespoon chopped cilantro

1 green onion, chopped

½ teaspoon garlic powder

1 tablespoon of minced fresh ginger

1 tablespoon olive oil or avocado oil 

Nut Sauce:

2 tablespoons almond butter

1 tablespoon coconut aminos

1 tablespoon rice vinegar

Broccoli Slaw:

2 tablespoons almond butter

¼ cup of rice vinegar

2 tablespoon Coconut Aminos

2 cloves fresh ginger, minced

2 teaspoon sesame oil

10 oz bag of broccoli coleslaw mix

1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro

1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint

1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil

Instructions

In a bowl combine turkey, shredded carrots, cilantro, green onion, garlic, and ginger. Mix together. Make 4 patties.  

Turn on your grill or iron skillet.  Add oil.  Place patties on the skillet and fry for about 5 minutes per side, until they reach an internal temperature of 165ºF. Remove and set aside.

To make nut sauce, in a small bowl combine all of the ingredients and set aside.

To make the slaw, in another large bowl combine almond butter, rice vinegar, Coconut Aminos, ginger, and sesame oil.  Whisk to fully combine.  Add slaw, cilantro, mint, and basil.  Toss together until well coated.  Set in the refrigerator, covered, until needed.

Serve Buddha burgers with slaw.

 

Notes

You can. make these burgers with any ground meat, including beef, chicken, and buffalo.

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PALEO & WHOLE30 DATE PASTE

PALEO & WHOLE30 DATE PASTE

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PALEO & WHOLE30 DATE PASTE

PALEO & WHOLE30 PUMPKIN PIE FILLING

When I began living a PALEO & WHOLE30 lifestyle, I craved dessert recipes using brown sugar.  I really felt like I was missing out.  Sometimes I would compromise and buy a brown sugar substitute sweetener.  But these sweeteners are unnatural and often very expensive.  I remember the day I discovered date paste.  I was so thrilled to know I could utilize a fruit that is so nutritious and use it to replace brown sugar and maple syrup.  I love date paste on grain-free toast! 

NUTRITIONAL VALUE

This recipe calls for homemade date paste which is allowable on both a Paleo and Whole30 diet.  The paste is super easy to make and nutritious.  Did you know that dates are higher in polyphenols than any of the most commonly consumed fruits and vegetables?  Polyphenols neutralize free radicals, helping to reduce the damage caused by inflammation.   Inflammation is directly associated with heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, Alzheimer’s, and a list of autoimmune diseases.  Dates are also a good source of various vitamins and minerals, and fiber and contain calcium, iron, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, and zinc?

RECIPE TASTE PROFILE

Date paste is sweet.  That’s its best quality!  So any dessert or dish you create using date paste will require a wine with sweetness to match.  If the dish or dessert is just slightly sweet, you can include an off-dry white wine with dinner.  If making a dessert, stick to wines with more sweetness like Tawny Port, late-harvest whites, and even Canadian Icewine!

RECIPES USING DATE PASTE

PALEO & WHOLE30 BREAD PUDDING

PALEO & WHOLE30 BREAD PUDDING WITH VANILLA SAUCE

MAKING DATE PASTE

Place pitted dates in food processor or blender and add water.

Puree until smooth.

Transfer to a sterilized jar until needed or use right away.

 

  • Author: FRESHDOH
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Total Time: 5
  • Yield: 1.5 cups 1x
Scale

Ingredients

2 cups tightly packed pitted dates

½ cup of water (more if needed)

Instructions

In the bowl of a large food processor fitted with an “S” blade or in a blender, combine the pitted dates and water.  Process until very smooth, scraping down the bowl to make sure all of the dates are incorporated.  Use as required for recipe.

 

Notes

This recipe is so simple to prepare and can give your desserts that brown sugar sweetness.

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PALEO & WHOLE30 TILAPIA WITH VEGAN PARMESAN & GARLICKY MAYO

PALEO & WHOLE30 TILAPIA WITH VEGAN PARMESAN & GARLICKY MAYO

 

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PALEO & WHOLE30 TILAPIA WITH VEGAN PARMESAN & GARLICKY MAYO

PALEO & WHOLE30 TILAPIA WITH GARLICKY MAYO

In maintaining a Paleo & Whole30 lifestyle, my husband Shawn and I are always looking for different quality sources of whole foods high in protein.  We generally consume a high protein, low carbohydrate lifestyle.  And while my diet is grain-free, Shawn enjoys wheat products because he has no gluten allergy nor sensitivity. 

RECIPE TASTE PROFILE

The predominant taste and flavour sensations of this dish are fattiness (from the mayo) and saltiness (from the Parma).  

DIRTY-BIRDY WINE PARTNER (FOR THOSE FOLLOWING DIRTY-PALEO AND DIRTY-WHOLE30)

This simple dish has loads of fattiness and flavour due to the mayo and Parma.  While Tilapia is delicate, the mayo and plant-based cheese adds substance.  Choose a light, fruity white wine with lots of zinging acidity to offset the fattiness and the saltiness.  Examples of this wine include stainless steel Chardonnay, White Burgundy, Pinot Grigio, Pinot Gris, dry Riesling, Vino Verde, and Sauvignon Blanc. 

NUTRITIONAL VALUE OF RECIPE

I’ve added tilapia and other white fish to our diet on occasion. Tilapia is surprisingly high in protein.  A 3.5-ounce serving (100 grams) possesses only 128 calories and yet 26 grams of protein.  This same size piece of salmon has 20 grams.  Add to this that Tilapia is rich in trace minerals and vitamins, such as B12, phosphorus, selenium, niacin, and potassium.  Tilapia is almost as high in protein as chicken.  A 3-ounce fillet of broiled tilapia has nearly 26 grams of protein. The same amount of skinless cooked chicken breast offers about 26.5 grams of protein – a difference of merely 3.5 grams. 

Where Tilapia falls way short is in Omega 3.   It also has higher Omega-6 than other fish. The reason is that the farmed fish are fed corn-based food and oils that increase its Omega-6 content.  Omega-6 intake from fish consumed in moderation is not an issue for Shawn and me, nor for many other people.   But those with heart issues should keep their Omega-6 consumption down, in general.  Eating far too much omega 6 can raise your blood pressure, lead to blood clots that can cause a heart attack or stroke, and may cause your body to retain water.  The secret is refraining from eating processed foods high in corn and vegetable oils.

If you tend to eat more whole foods than eating tilapia on occasion can be a nice alternative to beef, pork, chicken, and other fish.  Look for tilapia that comes from the United States and Canada where farming practices are tightly regulated and hormone treatment is prohibited.   Refrain from Chinese tilapia.  

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7ebdlmk0Ug] 

Tilapia is also referred to as St. Peter’s fish, as it is believed to be the variety caught when Christ asked St. Peter to cast out his net in the Sea of Galilee. 

Here’s a super simple and absolutely delicious tilapia recipe using only 4 ingredients and 1 seasoning.

 

  • Author: FRESHDOH
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 12
  • Total Time: 17
  • Yield: 2 1x
  • Category: PALEO & WHOLE30
  • Method: BAKING
  • Cuisine: MAIN COURSE
  • Diet: Gluten Free
Scale

Ingredients

6 (5 oz)  filets Tilapia

3 to 4 cloves minced garlic

1/2 cup Paleo & Whole30 Homemade mayo (Recipe below)*

1 cup homemade Paleo & Whole30 Vegan Parmesan**

Freshly ground black pepper

Check out this blog for homemade PALEO & WHOLE30 mayo:

https://freshdoh.com/11-secrets-to-best-homemade-mayo-paleo-and-whole30/

*Check out this blog for the Paleo & Whole30 Vegan Parmesan recipe:

https://freshdoh.com/blogs/glutenandgrainfreelifestyle/paleo-whole30-vegan-parmesan

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (204 degrees C). Oil your pan or line a pan with foil or parchment paper, and grease lightly. Place the tilapia fillets on the pan.

HOMEMADE MAYO RECIPE:

Yolks from 2 to 3 eggs

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1 cup olive oil or avocado oil 

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice (optional)

Make sure eggs and oil are at room temperature.   n the small bowl add yolks, mustard, lemon juice, and season with freshly ground black pepper.  Use an immersion blender or balloon whisk for 30 seconds until the yolks are thick.  Whisk or blend for another 20 seconds.  While whisking or blending, add tiny drops of the oil into the mixture.  Just drops.  Keep whisking or blending.  Do this until you’ve added 1/4 cup of the oil.  This is important for proper emulsification.  Otherwise, the oil will split from the other ingredients.  When the mixture begins to thicken and emulsify, continue to add the rest of the oil now at a steady pace in a stream.  When all of the oil has been added, scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl and process for an extra 10 seconds.  Cover and set in the refrigerator until needed.

Mix garlic with mayo.  Spread garlic mayo over each filet.  Sprinkle each filet with vegan parmesan.  Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until fish is white and flakes easily.

Notes

Tilapia can be substituted for any white fish.

 

The recipe baking temperature and time is an estimate.  Follow your own oven’s temperature and cooking time. It takes a gas oven 10-15 minutes to reach the desired temperature. Electric ovens can take 10 minutes longer than that.  The age of your oven will also determine the temperature, time for roasting or baking, and where you want to place your dish in the oven.  The bottom of your oven may be hotter than the top, depending on its condition.  This also includes where to set your dish under the broiler.  So use your own best judgment based on the type, condition, and age of your oven.  Prep times will also vary depending on how slow or quickly you like to work.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 2

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